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JAPANESE KNOTWEED IN SUMMER - SPOT THE SIGNS

Japanese Knotweed is a quick growing invasive weed which if left untreated can have disastrous consequences for the structural integrity of a property. The plant grows at a phenomenal rate of 10cm per day and it is this relentless growth which makes it capable of growing through into the tiniest cracks in masonry and concrete. As banks and building societies have been known to refuse mortgages on properties with Japanese Knotweed without a treatment programme in place, it is important not to ignore any suspect plants on or anywhere near your property.

Japanese Knotweed is prone to change and the invasive weed looks completely different depending on what season it is. Japanese Knotweed is especially damaging during summer so it is critical to know how to identify the fast growing plant at this time of the year.  

 

HOW TO  SPOT JAPANESE KNOTWEED IN SUMMER?

 

Japanese Knotweed can be quite difficult to identify in spring while the roots are just coming through. However, the plant is much easier to identify in summer. After emerging in spring, Knotweed grows at an incredible rate and the plant is likely to have reached 2-3 metres in height in summer. Dense clumps of foliage form with the green leaves coupled with a number of small yellow flowers. These small flowers will gradually turn from yellow to white as autumn approaches. The leaves of Knotweed are quite noticeable, shaped like a spade with a straightened edge and pointed tip. If you look at the bottom of the tall plant, you should notice stems similar to bamboo in a cane like structure. These stems are green with red spots and if broken, the stems will appear hollow on the inside.

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOU SUSPECT JAPANESE KNOTWEED

 

If you notice any suspicious plants anywhere near your property, it is important to have the plant examined immediately before it grows out of control and causes any damage to a property. Japanese Knotweed can grow up to seven metres in any direction so the longer it is left untreated, the larger the suspect plant will become. While it is not a legal obligation to treat Japanese Knotweed on your property, homeowners can be liable if the invasive plant spread onto neighbouring land.

 

If you notice any suspicious plants near your property then upload your photos for free to Wise Knotweed Solutions and our expert surveyors can tell you if the suspect plant is indeed Japanese Knotweed.

 

By Jake Ryan of Wise Knotweed Solutions for Bristol Property Centre.